Who is Buckingham Palace suspect David Huber? | The Sun

BUCKINGHAM Palace suspect David Huber was seized by armed cops after allegedly throwing shotgun cartridges into the grounds of the royal residence.

The 60-year-old dog breeder triggered a massive security alert and was arrested on Tuesday at 7pm.


WHO IS DAVID HUBER?

David Huber, 60, is a dog breeder from Cumbria.

He breeds Hungarian Vizlas at his remote countryside cottage overlooking the fells.

He took skiing holidays and is said to be single.

WHAT DID DAVID HUBER DO?

Huber allegedly threw shotgun cartridges into the grounds of Buckingham Palace, triggering a major security response at 7pm on Tuesday.

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It came just days before King Charles' coronation on Saturday.

And the King had only just left the Palace minutes before.

Witnesses claimed they heard Huber shout "I'm going to kill the King", before he was dragged away.

Huber was arrested on suspicion of possessing an offensive weapon after he was searched and a knife was found.

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Witnesses reported seeing him throw a "number of items" into the grounds before police dragged him away.

Officers then carried out a controlled explosion near to the Palace gates, which was heard by royal fans setting up camp along The Mall ahead of the weekend.

WHAT WAS IN DAVID HUBER'S RUCKSACK?

Images obtained by The Sun show the suspect's bag and its scattered contents.

Inside there were two passports, a phone, a wallet, keys, a large brown envelope, bank cards, and a laptop case.

There appeared to be a picture of a small child and a book, The Happiness Advantage, about using positive psychology to “enhance individual achievement”.



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